Prints and Sculpture

This work focuses on how printmaking and sculpture can be combined and respond to one another. Through a back and forth of representing sculpture in 2- dimensions and prints in 3-dimensions, work has emerged that combines both. His work questions how we understand and relate to 2-dimensional and 3-dimensional spaces in our environment by imagining new ways of understanding their relationship.

Click on the thumbnail images below for title and dimensions.

Lanzillo received a fellowship to complete Matrix 1, an interactive sculpture at Carleton College. Its installation location is traveled regularly by those going from upper campus to Lyman lakes. The sculpture breaks up this space, framing the lakes below, and confronts people with a novel form to move underneath while in transit. It also has a four foot opening to allow people to go inside the structure. It is made of 23 different sections with over 8000 welds. It was installed on a sloping hill and completed over the course of 8 weeks.

This project inspired all subsequent work as it stands as the foundational sculptural iteration. Lanzillo then wanted to understand how this work could be imagined in 2- dimensions.

Flowing Arch, the first print featured, is derived from a photograph of Matrix 1. It was made using 20 screens, each screen making up a section of the image. These same screens were then used like stamps to imagine a new sculptural form in Imagination’s Expansion, the second larger print. This process mimicked the process of building Matrix 1 in sections, with each section adding on to the next. After reimagining Matrix 1 in prints, these prints informed later sculptural pieces. This process of printmaking informing sculpture and sculpture informing printmaking continues through the rest of the body of work.

Refuse #1 and Refuse #2 are both primarily made using Collagraph matrices comprised of scrap pieces of masonite prints from Wormhole #2.

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